Review: Password Manager XP

There's a good chance this content may be outdated!

This post is 1 year old—a long time on the internet. Any content within is provided as-is and is not guaranteed to work on modern systems - your mileage may vary.

In the day of password requirements that are absolutely insane, you need a password manager to keep yourself from going insane. We’re going to be taking a look at Password Manager XP from CP Lab. With the amount of passwords we in IT need to remember, a good password manager is critical. I have a few that I use but I decided to see if I could find one with similar or better features than the ones I currently use have.

Obtaining and Installing

You can obtain a trial of Password Manager XP from the CP Lab website here. The installation of the Standard version (which we’re taking a look at here) is a standard next, next, finish install. It doesn’t get any easier. There is a Professional version that has a client-server model that would be more suited towards an enterprise as it has Active Directory integration. The standard edition would be fine for an individual or maybe small teams who share a database.

First Run

Right after you install Password Manager XP, you can launch it and you’ll see the default example database that is installed (if you so choose to install it).

Password Manager XP main screen

Password Manager XP main screen

I like the way Password Manager XP sets up the UI. You can see all your databases and tree view of passwords on the left, and on the right is your main screen. I like having the multiple database views. This can allow you to have a “work” passwords database and a “personal” passwords database, for instance. As always, it’s wise advice to never put all your eggs in one basket. Creating a database is actually very simple. Just go to the Database menu and create a new database. From here, you can name your database and assign a master password.

2016-06-17_18-34-09You can also specify where you’d like to have the database file stored. For me, I prefer to put it in a syched folder such as my OneDrive or DropBox so that it’s accessible on all my devices. However, if you have only one computer, it might make sense to put it in a secure location. Now, your passwords are encrypted in the database, but I also prefer to throw in some security by obscurity – throw my database in a obscure location and one accessible only by my user account. However, for this review, I kept everything default.

Adding your passwords

What good is a database without any data? Pretty useless. Likewise, a password database doesn’t have any passwords is forcing you to remember all your passwords and that’s not good. Once you have a database created, you can start creating entries. To keep yourself organized, you can create folders and to keep it really customization, you can select any icon you wish for the folder.

2016-06-17_18-34-55Once you have some folders created, you can now create password entries. This is as simple as right clicking and selecting “New Record”. On the new record screen, you can select an icon, a name, set the website address (if there is one), and generate or insert your password. You can also attach files, generate a password, set a password expiration date (useful for reminding you to change passwords if the service doesn’t expire them for you), and even leave some notes about the password too.

2016-06-19_13-00-57As you can see, I’ve set some test passwords (no these won’t grant you access to anything in The Cave) so you can see how the data is displayed.

The password generator function works amazingly well and is about as un-complicated as it could possibly be (which is what you’d expect but believe it that other software makes this process just as complicated).

2016-06-19_13-08-11Security is also important as these passwords can access anything. Password Manager XP has built in encryption of all different kinds. You can use any kind you’d like. Or all of them. The choice is yours.

2016-06-19_13-21-30

Special Features

This is one of the killer features of this program, in my mind. You can install the program to a flash drive and copy your password database so you can take it with you. This is a really cool feature if you carry a flash drive with you. I always have a USB drive on my keychain which is useful when I need to transfer some files quickly at work.

2016-06-19_13-09-55There is also web browser functionality built in. Other applications require special plugins to be acquired separately and configured separately but Password Manager XP has this all included in the box.

Final Thoughts

Overall, I really like Password Manager XP and I plan on using this as my primary password manager. While there are other options available, I urge you to give Password Manager XP a try along with anything else that you’re considering. I think you will find that Password Manager XP will meet or exceed your expectations! This works with all versions of Windows.

Given what I’ve seen and used thus far in my trial, I give Password Manager XP a 8/10. I highly recommend it!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *