Deleting the past… on Facebook

DANGER, WILL ROBINSON! DANGER! THIS ARTICLE IS OVER A YEAR OLD AND IS POSSIBLY OUT OF DATE! THE INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN MAY NOT BE ACCURATE ANYMORE! PROCEED WITH CAUTION!

UPDATED 9/1 – NEW VERSION OF SCRIPT

Yes, Facebook is sketchy… have you seen their “privacy” settings?! Maybe you don’t want to entirely delete your Facebook, that’s understandable, but maybe you just want to delete all that incriminating evidence or you just don’t want to allow Facebook to get their hands on all that information. Like I posted in my anti-cloud rant, do you really know where your data is? Take for example The IT Cave and my personal blog. This data is on a  dedicated server in one of Softlayer’s data centers. That means, if I really wanted to, I could buy the hard drives from Softlayer and have them shipped to me. My data could be in my hands. Or I could put a ticket in to have Softlayer destroy the drives in the server. The data is mine and I control it. If I don’t want anyone to see it, I can remove it… or even shut the server down… or even restrict it.

Cloud services, yes, Facebook included, don’t give you this kind of control. Hell, Facebook even makes it difficult to mass delete stuff. See, in the business of Facebook you are the product! Yes, Facebook sells you for money. Services like Google Plus, don’t do this. To Google, you are a user. A friend. Not an item to be bought, sold, rented, traded, etc. And Google gives you some excellent control over your data. Anyways, enough rambling… on to deleting Facebook data!

So to proceed, you will need a web browser that supports the plugin, iMacros. I did this with Firefox, but the addon might be available on Chrome and other browsers… I’m not too sure. If not, just go with Firefox.

Once you have iMacros installed, login to Facebook and if you have timeline, go to your Activity Feed. No one can see this page but you… but its a log of every action you’ve made on Facebook. Now, iMacros can be used to mass delete photos, friends, wall posts, etc. Anyways, one of the issues is that Facebook updates their code… constantly. They don’t like you doing this so they try to make it difficult. I’ll try to keep this code up-t0-date, but as of August 31, 2012,  it’s working.

Create a new macro. I’m giving you the code, so you can do anything you like on the page. Once you have the macro, edit it. Delete the current code. Copy and paste this code in:

VERSION BUILD=7500718 RECORDER=FX
TAB T=1
SET !ERRORIGNORE YES
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=2 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Unlike...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Unlike
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=2 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Unlike...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Unlike
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=A ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=2 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Unlike...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Unlike
TAG POS=1 TYPE=A ATTR=ID:js_9
TAG POS=1 TYPE=A ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Delete<SP>Photo...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete<SP>Photo
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=LABEL ATTR=TXT:Delete<SP>all<SP>app<SP>activity
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:CHECKBOX ATTR=ID:u7wfrn_1 CONTENT=YES
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Unlike...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Unlike
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Delete...
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Delete
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=1 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Hidden<SP>from<SP>Timeline
TAG POS=2 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>itemIcon<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_dd4fa3<SP>customimg
TAG POS=2 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Hidden<SP>from<SP>Timeline
TAG POS=8 TYPE=I ATTR=CLASS:mrs<SP>defaultIcon<SP>customimg<SP>img<SP>sp_8fqrt7<SP>sx_033ffa
TAG POS=3 TYPE=SPAN ATTR=TXT:Hidden<SP>from<SP>Timeline
TAG POS=1 TYPE=INPUT:BUTTON ATTR=NAME:ok&&VALUE:Okay

Ok, here’s what this code does…

  1. It ignores errors so it won’t stop on you.
  2. It runs through your feed and deletes, presses ok if Facebook pops some errors… etc.

This code might miss a few things or get hung up. I’ve tried to make it as automated as possible. If you have a lot, it will take a LONG time to delete everything. Let it run over night… or over the course of several days if you have a lot of stuff. Once it’s done, go back and hit up everything that it missed! 🙂

 

I want to see more cloud services hacked.

Microsoft’s picture of storage “evolution”

I want to see more cloud services hacked. Why? Because it’ll teach people that you shouldn’t trust your data with someone else. Did you know that MegaUpload actually had valid users using its services for storage other than piracy? Well, when the Department of Justice seized MegaUpload, all those users lost their legit files. But that’s one scenario. I highly doubt the DOJ will be busting down DropBox’s doors anytime soon or even JustCloud’s. But what if one of these cloud storage service companies goes belly up (you know, bankrupt)? It’s a question that a lot of users have been asking all over the internet.

Well, let me give you two possible scenarios:

Scenario 1: The company goes bankrupt and is nice enough to continue operations with a notice period to allow you to download your files before they’re gone forever or they might just disappear overnight if they’re not large enough. Do you have local copies of your files?

Scenario 2: Another company purchases the bankrupt company and your information is safe… for now.

It’s really a 50/50 chance of what could happen. And of course, being raided by the DOJ or going bankrupt aren’t the only things that could happen to your files. What if hackers steal user login information? They’ll suddenly have full access to your account and be able to download any of your data… especially if the storage company generates a private encryption key based off of your login information.

While I don’t want to sound hypocritical, yes I do use cloud storage services. However – I use it to temporarily hold large files or to keep file structures in tact so I can download them to an external hard drive. Seriously – if you want a cost affordable solution, go buy an external USB or eSATA hard drive and periodically, take an entire snapshot of your hard drive. If you’re really paranoid, store it in a fireproof safe along with all your other vital documents. Cloud crisis adverted.

VMWare Private Virtual Network w/ Internet Connectivity

1000px-Vmware.svgI run a VMWare lab on my computer. Virtualization is a great technology and it’s a subject I could probably write a hundred articles on. However, this article is about virtual networking within VMWare. My scenario may different a bit from yours but this is how I overcame the blockade and if you have found a better solution, I’d love to hear what you’ve done.

My scenario is that I need an isolated lab network, but the computers in the lab need internet access This is because I often test things on Active Directory domains including DNS and I want to keep all of this isolated from my production environment. By default, VMWare gives you the following network adapter choices:

  • Bridge Networking – this is like your virtual machine being directly plugged into a switch. It receives it’s own IP via your network’s DHCP server that is separate from the host’s.
  • NAT Networking – this is where the virtual machine and the host share the same IP address on the network. Your virtual machine will be routed packets via NAT.
  • Host-Only Networking – this is a completely separate and isolated network within your host. There is no internet access or access to the LAN your host resides on from the virtual machine.

To provide connectivity to the isolated network, I setup a pfSense firewall virtual machine. You can download the latest version of pfSense here. They once offered a preinstalled VMWare image of an installation, however the link is dead so you will need to setup a VMWare image of pfSense. The nice thing is, you can use pfSense as a LiveCD or actually install it. I created a virtual machine with 384 MB of RAM (it really could run on 256 MB) and installed it to a 20 GB virtual hard disk. To make pfSense work as a router between your virtual network and your LAN, you need to add another virtual NIC.

The main pfSense console from the terminalIn this screen shot, you can see I have two adapters. em0 and em1. In your virtual machine settings, you will need to set one of the adapters to Host-Only (this will be your LAN adapter) and the other to Bridge (this will be your WAN adapter). Your em0 adapter will be the first Network Adapter in the Virtual Machines settings window.

VMWare includes a DHCP server, you can disable it as pfSense has it’s own DHCP server and this is what we will use in the lab environment.

Next, you will need to modify your WAN port settings. To do this via the web interface, you will need a virtual machine on this isolated network or you can do it from the pfSense console.

Your settings will be very basic – the WAN will be DHCP (or assign it a static IP if you wish). I leave it as DHCP so I can move my lab from my work network to my home network without having to reconfigure anything other than starting the pfSense virtual machine. The important part to note are the settings regarding private IP addresses. As you are aware, routers are configured to not route packets for private networks. Since this pfSense installation has it’s WAN port connected to a private network, you need to allow pfSense to route private packets. To allow this, just uncheck the two boxes under Private Networks. Save and apply settings to the WAN port.

In the following example, you can see the virtual machine while on a Host-Only connection can access the internet via our pfSense firewall:

Windows: Allow non-admin users to install printers & printer drivers

This is a post that I originally posted on my personal blog. It has some great value so I figured I’d move it over to the cave.

This is a very handy GPO that you can implement on your network to allow non-admin users to manage printers. This is great, especially if your users move around a bit or, like, in my company, users have laptops that they take home and can work from home. My users need to be able to install printers and manage them without administrator access.Here’s what you do.

Create a new GPO and call it whatever you’d like. Remember: it’s bad practice to use the “Default Domain Policy”. Apply the following settings:

 

Computer Configuration (Enabled) > Policies > Windows Settings >Security Settings >Local Policies/Security Options > Devices
POLICY SETTING
Devices: Prevent users from installing printer drivers Disabled

 

Printers
POLICY SETTING COMMENT
Point and Print Restrictions Enabled
Users can only point and print to these servers: Disabled
Enter fully qualified server names separated by semicolons
Users can only point and print to machines in their forest Disabled
Security Prompts:
When installing drivers for a new connection: Do not show warning or elevation prompt
When updating drivers for an existing connection: Do not show warning or elevation prompt
This setting only applies to:
Windows Vista and later

 

System/Driver Installation
POLICY SETTING COMMENT
Allow non-administrators to install drivers for these device setup classes Enabled
ALLOW USERS TO INSTALL DEVICE DRIVERS FOR THESE CLASSES:
{4d36e979-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}
{4658ee7e-f050-11d1-b6bd-00c04fa372a7}
To create a list of device classes, click Show. In the Show Contents dialog box, in the Value column,
type a GUID that represents a device setup class
(for example, {25DBCE51-6C8F-4A72-8A6D-B54C2B4FC835}).

 

This will allow non-admin users to install and manage printers on computers without admin access. Pay close attention to ” Allow Users to install device drivers for these classes: ” as you will need to add these two GUIDs to the GPO. If you have any questions, let me know and I’ll try to assist you the best I can.

Partial credit to Chad_Anderson over on the TechNet forums. [ SOURCE ]