Upgrading to Windows 10

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Windows-10-wallpaper-New-LogoBelieve it or not, there are some people out there that do not want to upgrade to Windows 10. I’m currently attending online classes to work on my BA degree and one of the Facebook groups seems to have a lot of hatred towards Windows 10. But before we dive into the fear, let’s look at all the different things Microsoft has improved on in this version over Windows 8 and 8.1.

This is the first version of Windows truly designed for all devices. Phones, tablets, laptops, desktops, media devices, Windows 10 is designed to be the one OS. Windows 8 and 8.1 were also designed this way, but they just were not executed well. We all remember that with Windows 8, Microsoft killed the start button.

No Start Button. Image courtesy: http://www.thewindowsclub.com
No Start Button. Image courtesy: http://www.thewindowsclub.com

This sent people into a whirlwind and naturally Microsoft realized what a mistake it was. Shortly after that fiasco, the next version, 8.1, came out and this time it had a Start button – but not a Start Menu. Microsoft of course responded along the lines of, “You asked for the Start button so that’s what you got. You still have to use the Start Screen.” The solution around this is products like Start8 and Classic Shell. Both of which provided a Start button on Windows 8 as well as the Start menu and on Windows 8.1 added Start Menu functionality to the Start button.

There are some noticeable changes between Windows 7 and Windows 8 and 8.1. The interface is flatter and most (but not all) icons changed to a flatter theme. Aero was axed so some glass icons are out of place. Windows 8.X boots significantly faster as well.

The Future is Windows 10

The awesome thing about Microsoft is that much like their products, they have changed. First off, Windows 10 (for home users) is free. Yes, free. Why would people turn down something free? It’s not the price tag. I’ve heard many different things like “I’ll wait to the first Service Pack” or “It’s just like Windows 8”.

One of the greatest things Microsoft did prior to the general release of Windows 10 is come up with the Windows Insider Program. This program is great for technolophiles as we get to work with builds of Windows 10 before they’re released to the general public. If you’re a technician, I highly suggest you sign up. All you need is a Microsoft Account. It’s free! You’ll get the latest features before anyone else (or if you wish, you can switch over to the slow cycle so you’ll get features at a slower pace). This is always great because you’ll be able to get features before others.

With Windows 10, Microsoft has transformed to Windows as a Service. This works sort of like the way Apple has moved OS X. Updates are now delivered free and this way devices are able to run a same code base. Of course, in the Enterprise, they still must pay for Windows upgrades. For home users, it’s definitely free and should be free. Right now, Windows 10 will be offered for free for the next year before Microsoft will charge for it (will they just keep it free? It’s too early to tell). So if you (or any users) are clinging on to Windows 8 or 8.1, it would be a good idea to click on the upgrade button.

Smooth Upgrades

So if you’re like me, you know that Windows upgrades used to be painful. Basically, you’d just want to format your hard drive (after backing up) and start fresh. Windows just never really did upgrades right. Or you’d take the more expensive route and just buy a new computer. Microsoft realized this. Windows 10 is designed to be upgradable easily. If you’re familiar with how Apple does updates in OS X, it works in a very similar method.

If you have Windows 8, or Windows 8.1, Windows 10 will be delivered to you through Windows Update.

2015-09-02 12-02-08Once the process starts, it’s incredibly easy to upgrade. It works just like a Next Next Next type of installer.

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The upgrade process just takes an hour or so and viola! You’ve got Windows 10. Remember, this is a whole new Microsoft! If you or any of your users need help with Windows 10, Microsoft has a great support site available.

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